This military medal is decorated with a black-and-white ribbon. Two swords meet at the centre of a cross with a German imperial eagle. The words Preussens Tapferen Kriegern “To Prussia’s Brave Soldiers” are written on the front of the medal. These medals were given to veterans from the First World War who fought alongside Germany. This medal was received by Sandor Vadasz, a Jewish veteran.

Sandor Vadsz: A Jewish Veteran of the First World War

Medal received by Sandor Vadasz, a Jewish veteran. Two swords meet at the centre of a cross with a German imperial eagle. The words Preussens Tapferen Kriegern “To Prussia’s Brave Soldiers” are written on the front of the medal. (Photo: Peter Berra)
1

Medal received by Sandor Vadasz, a Jewish veteran. Two swords meet at the centre of a cross with a German imperial eagle. The words Preussens Tapferen Kriegern “To Prussia’s Brave Soldiers” are written on the front of the medal. (Photo: Peter Berra)

These medals were given to veterans from the First World War who fought alongside Germany. (Photo: Peter Berra)
2

These medals were given to veterans from the First World War who fought alongside Germany. (Photo: Peter Berra)

Portrait of Sandor Vadasz in his decorated uniform, circa 1915.
3

Portrait of Sandor Vadasz in his decorated uniform, circa 1915.

Sandor Vadsz on horseback in his uniform in 1915.
4

Sandor Vadsz on horseback in his uniform in 1915.

Jewish Participation in World War I

Many Jews participated in the First World War effort between 1914 and 1918. Despite this, because of Germany’s postwar socio-economic difficulties, Jews were scapegoated for the country’s defeat. The Nazis used this argument in their antisemitic propaganda to justify their hatred and persecution of Jews.

Sandor Vadasz’s Journey during World War II

Born in Hungary in 1895, Sandor Vadasz became an engineer and worked in Turkey in 1938. During World War II, he stayed in Africa before going to Paris and Brazil. With help from the Canadian Jewish Congress, Sandor immigrated to Montreal in 1949 with his wife Julianna and mother-in-law.

Evelyn Uditsky, a friend of the Vadasz family, donated this military medal to the Montreal Holocaust Museum in 2010.

This project is part of the implementation of the Plan culturel numérique du Québec.Objets phares de l'Holocauste, Plan culturel numérique du Québec.

Download our App

Visit the Montreal Holocaust Museum with our app for Apple or Android tablets.

Nouvelle Reliée

Are you a teacher?

Discover resources at your disposal to teach the history of the Holocaust to your class.

Go to Education