This booklet was made by residents of the OSE (‘’Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants’’) orphanage of Le Vésinet in France. It contains texts written by Jewish children who survived the Holocaust and grew up in the orphanage.

A Souvenir from a OSE Orphenage

This booklet was made by residents of the OSE (‘’Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants’’) orphanage of Le Vésinet in France. Inside it are texts written by Jewish children who survived the Holocaust and grew up in the orphanage.
1

This booklet was made by residents of the OSE (‘’Oeuvre de Secours aux Enfants’’) orphanage of Le Vésinet in France. Inside it are texts written by Jewish children who survived the Holocaust and grew up in the orphanage.

Claude Jume, 15 years old, writes about his first day at the house.
2

Claude Jume, 15 years old, writes about his first day at the house.

Text written by Jacques Knoploch, a young man about to leave the orphanage, in which he expresses his gratitude for his time at the house.
3

Text written by Jacques Knoploch, a young man about to leave the orphanage, in which he expresses his gratitude for his time at the house.

Print from the souvenir booklet of Le Vésinet orphanage.
4

Print from the souvenir booklet of Le Vésinet orphanage.

Description of the room’s decorations, including Jacques’ room with cinema and Charlie Chaplin posters.
5

Description of the room’s decorations, including Jacques’ room with cinema and Charlie Chaplin posters.

Photograph of a group of young boys at Le Vésinet orphanage in 1948.
6

Photograph of a group of young boys at Le Vésinet orphanage in 1948.

Jacques Kasma: A Child Rescued by the OSE

Jacques Kasma, born Kaszemacher, was one of the young men rescued by the OSE, a Jewish organization which saved more than 5,000 children during the Holocaust. His parents, Henri Kaszemacher and Chaja Sura Bajwelcwaig, were originally from Poland, but settled in Paris before he was born. Jacques’ father was a driver in the French Army and captured in 1940. His mother was deported to the Drancy Camp in 1943. Jacques was hidden in Normandy during the war, before being rescued by the OSE. He lived in the orphanage until his 18th birthday in 1953.

Jacques Kasma Known as Tit-Bo from La boîte à surprises

In the orphanage, Jacques met the famous Marcel Marceau who taught him the art of mime. He settled in Montreal in 1960 and played the mime Tit-Bo in La boîte à surprises, a popular children’s television show. Besides working in cinema, Jacques was a member of the research team at the Douglas Psychiatric Hospital for more than 20 years.

This booklet, along with other documents, was acquired by the Montreal Holocaust Museum in 2014.

This project is part of the implementation of the Plan culturel numérique du QuébecObjects of Interest of the Holocaust, Plan culturel numérique du Québec

Other Objects of Interest

Are you a teacher?

Discover resources at your disposal to teach the history of the Holocaust to your class.

Go to Education

Donate an Object

To donate an object to the Montreal Holocaust Museum call at (514) 345-2605 or fill out this form.

Fill out the form